DATES TO REMEMBER:

Tuesday, October 17: Voter Registration Deadline for General Election

Tuesday, October 31: Deadline to apply for a Mail-In Ballot by Mail for General Election

Monday, November 6:  3:00 p.m. Deadline for In-Person Mail-In Ballot Applications for General Election

Tuesday, November 7: General Election


You can register to vote by downloading a registration form at http://nj.gov/state/elections/voting-information.html#vrf. Please fill out the form for your county of residence. Once the form is complete, mail or deliver it to the County Commissioner of Registration or the Superintendent of Elections. If you need assistance or have questions, please call 1-877-NJ-VOTER (1-877-658-6837.)

If we want Complete Streets in Essex we must vote for people who promote Complete Streets policies.

We must share the road with all forms of transportation.

Walking, riding a bike and using a wheelchair are all forms of  transportation.

#CompletetheVote

VOTE on November 7. Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Your voice counts!


Sample Ballot from Essex County

Research

Info on ballot measures from Ballotpedia:

New Jersey Public Question 1, the Bonds for Public Libraries Measure, is on the ballot in New Jersey as a legislatively referred bond question on November 7, 2017.[1]

“yes” vote supports authorizing the state to issue $125 million in bonds to provide grants to public libraries.
“no” vote opposes authorizing the state to issue $125 million in bonds to provide grants to public libraries.

The state librarian, with approval of the president of Thomas Edison State University, would develop the eligibility criteria for libraries to receive grants. Grants would cover 50 percent of the cost of projects. The other 50 percent would be provided by a library’s local government. Private donors would be allowed to contribute toward the 50 percent provided by a local government.[1]

Text of measure

Ballot title

The proposed ballot title is:[1]

Do you approve the “New Jersey Library Construction Bond Act”? This bond act authorizes the State to issue bonds in the aggregate principal amount of $125 million. The proceeds of the bonds will be used to provide grants to public libraries. The grants will be used to build, equip, and expand public libraries to increase capacity and serve the public.[2]

Ballot summary

The proposed interpretive statement is:[1]

Approval of this bond act will allow the State to sell $125 million in State general obligation bonds. Proceeds from the bonds will be used to provide grants to construct, expand, and equip public libraries. Municipalities or counties that fund public libraries will match the grant amount. The municipality or county may solicit private funding to support its match. The State Librarian, in consultation with the President of Thomas Edison State University, will set eligibility criteria for the grants.[2]

New Jersey Public Question 2, the Revenue from Environmental Damage Lawsuits Dedicated to Environmental Projects Amendment, is on the ballot in New Jersey as a legislatively referred constitutional amendment on November 7, 2017.[1]

“yes” vote supports allocating state revenue from legal settlements related to natural resource damages in cases of environmental contamination toward restoring and protecting natural resources and paying the costs of pursuing the settlements.
“no” vote opposes this amendment to allocate state revenue from legal settlements related to natural resource damages in cases of environmental contamination toward environmental projects and paying the costs of pursuing the settlements.

Overview

Design of the amendment

Question 2 would create a lockbox for state revenue from legal settlements and awards related to natural resource damages in cases of environmental contamination. Revenue in the lockbox would be used to restore or replace damaged or lost natural resources, protect natural resources, and pay the legal costs of pursuing settlements and rewards. The state would be required to prioritize the use of revenue in the fund to restoring the immediate area related to the settlement or case. If no project is deemed reasonable in the immediate area, then the revenue would be spent in the same water region. Up to 10 percent of the revenue in the fund would be authorized to be spent on state agencies related to the amendment, such as the Department of Environmental Protection.[1][2]

Revenue from contamination settlements

The amendment was proposed in response to disagreements between Gov. Chris Christie (R) and the Democratic-controlled New Jersey Legislature on how to spend revenue from large pollution settlements involving pollution in the Passaic River and Exxon Mobil. Gov. Christie’s budgets planned to spend about $103 million of the $580 million received from the multiple cases on environmental restoration.[3][4][5] While the case involving Exxon Mobil is being appealed, the cases involving the Passaic River brought in $355 million, of which $288 million was used to balance the state budget.[6]

 


 


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VELOmynameis and the Blk Grrrl Anti-Racist Book Fair is working with  Ville Platte Civil Rights Activist Arthur James Sampson Jr. for Justice for Ville Platte Pedestrians.

Pedestrians Deonte Williams, Cody Mayes, and Kevin Wilson were charged with the crime of WALKING WHILE BLACK. 

“A Ville Platte man and two teenagers are recovering after all three were hit by a truck. However, they are facing charges, and the driver isn’t. Police have fined the three for not wearing reflective clothing at night and charged them with obstructing a public passage…”  via Kendria LaFleu at KATC an ABC affiliate. 

We want:
1.Charges and fines against Deonte Williams, Cody Mayes, and Kevin Wilson to be dropped.
2. The Law/ordinance of walking without reflective clothing repealed.

We have begun a petition with Color of Change which we need for you to sign and share.

The Black community has historically been and continues to be home to the most hypersegregated communities in the United States. We do not have equity in many areas, including areas of active transportation, such as walking and bicycling.

Regardless of where you’re Black, whether it be in the metropolitan cities of Los Angeles & New York or in rural Ville Platte, Louisiana, you deserve justice. You deserve #TransportationEquity #BicycleEquity.

Give Transportation Equity to Ville Platte. Help the citizens of Ville Platte walk home without fear of being run over by a truck and charged with a crime. Tell Mayor Vidrine to drop the charges against Deonte Williams, Cody Mayes, and Kevin Wilson.

We all deserve the freedom to walk and bike in our communities without fear of being run over and charged with a crime.

Sign the petition share the story.

Follow us on twitter at @VELO_NYC.